All posts tagged social media data

1During a Kantar Twitter Workshop event, Larry Friedman, the Chief Research Officer at TNS, shared his excitement about the value that social media brings to a market researcher. His view, shared by many of the presenters was that social can be used in predictive models. “There is signal in the noise. You just have to extract it,” he explained. This gives marketers a jump on obtaining market reaction, enabling real-time decisions and adjustments as necessary.

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The September Fall TV new show rollout is a bit like Christmas. It’s an exciting time when people come together looking forward to merriment, focusing a little less on their diets and dreaming of the wonderful experiences coming their way. In this case, all the exciting new shows that have been heavily promoted by all the networks. However, sometimes the reality of it all is that the experience rarely lives up to all they hype and all you get are terrible memories you can’t erase.

Leading up to September we put together our dream watch lists:

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Yesterday I blogged about the VMA performances heard around the world. Today I am going to focus on what matters most with any award show – Fashion.

Taylor Swift looked beautiful with Great Gatsby-esque hair and many others were lovely or trendy but I really appreciated the throw back styles of a select few. Miley Cyrus seemed inspired by 2009 Gwen Stefani, because 4 years ago can be vintage.

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So now that the dust has settled, I think it’s safe to objectively reminisce on the magic and mayhem that is the MTV Video Music Awards.  Obviously the buzz was about Miley Cyrus and her (in)famous performance.  But there were other exciting events, Lady Gaga’s first performance of her new single “Applause” and Katy Perry closing the show with her biggest hit ever, “Roar.”

I’m not going to lie, I love the VMAs, in fact all things award-showy.  I love the fashion, the performances, agreeing or disagreeing with each award won, and above all: watching the crowd’s reactions.

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I know what I was excited about but I was interested to see what everyone else in the social world was excited about, talking about….and is still talking about.

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Join us on August 28, 2013 to hear our  Director of Research and Analytics share how social media analytics can help companies identify and manage perceptions about their brand!

Everyone can cite a few of the latest public corporate “oops” moments that inevitably make the rounds on social channels. It becomes a punch line on late night shows and then generally fades into distant memory. But what if negative perceptions about a brand persist and begin to impact sales, partnerships and even stock valuation? Join this webinar to learn:

  • How to identify where people are talking about your brand
  • How to successfully analyze negative content that detracts from the brand
  • Tips for leveraging insights to overcome negative brand perceptions

Mark Brandt, Visible’s Director of Research and Analytics, will address a case study showcasing a company currently experiencing a brand crisis. He will share how social media analytics can help companies monitor conversations about their brands, understand evolving issues and proactively manage brand perception.

Register today by clicking here

Visible recently supported the summer internship program of one its investors, Centurion Holdings. The summer internship program provides participants the opportunity to work with companies in Centurion’s portfolio. For Visible, it’s a great opportunity to share our social media technology and insight practices and help these students learn about social media, digital marketing, and how to think like a marketer.

Last week, Visible worked with the interns to deliver social media insights around traveler experiences with delayed flights. The goal of the project was to develop an understanding of traveler’s responses, as shared on social media, and make recommendations to marketers on specific practices they can adopt or changes they can make to improve the traveler experience. Read more…

Most marketers would agree that brand advocacy programs are a good idea.  The ultimate challenge is finding and nurturing customers that are so passionate about your brand that they become your brand’s strongest and most vocal advocates.  They are literally your biggest fans and are not shy about actively touting their opinions to their network.  Imagine the Connectors, Mavens and Salesmen from Malcom Gladwell’s The Tipping Point, all rolled into one individual.

Social media has made it easier than ever for brand advocates to share their opinions about their experiences.  It’s as simple as a Tweet, Pin, Facebook post, blog entry or product review on a shopping site.  But what truly drives people to express their passion for a brand is still largely a mystery.

The new Global Advocacy study from Social@Ogilvy used data from Visible Technologies to delve into the topic and uncover the key drivers of brand advocacy.  The Ogilvy study analyzed 7 million mentions of 22 brands and 8 feature films across 4 countries (China, Brazil, UK and US).  The findings include insights that true passion is rare, brands are largely failing at driving advocacy in social media, and that a high volume of advocacy is surprisingly driven by everyday experiences such as being delighted by a great product feature, an exceptional service experience or a good deal. Read more…

The world, and the media camped out in front of London’s St. Mary’s hospital, has been waiting for months for the arrival of the latest member of the British royal family.  At last, yesterday the baby’s birth was announced.  Social media lit up as posts flew about the #RoyalBaby.  To those of you who somehow missed it.  #itsaboy!  As you can see from the word cloud below, there was lots of discussion leading up to the birth about the baby, the baby’s parents, other royal family members, the hospital and the fact that the baby will be third in line to the British throne.

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Recently over lunch with an analyst friend of mine, the topic of data came up. (I know, exciting right.) Let me skip to the end and tell you our assertion – Data is useless. Coming from someone whose job it is to consult with companies on the tremendous value of data, it may seem a bit out of place, but the message I sought to convey, and that I help companies understand, is that data without segmentation is useless, and as I said over lunch, “It’s Just a dataset.”

The role of social data in enterprise environments is growing much more complex, and part of that complexity is driven from the need for this data to inform other key parts of the business with real, tangible benefits that can guide decisions, predict outcomes and validate expenses. One example of a specific segmentation that I build and deploy for clients on a regular basis is called category segmentations. Allow me to provide an example. If you’re a market researcher, for a major computer company whose job it is to gather consumer insights data, are metrics like share of voice or volume trend going to matter to you? Though they are valuable in some applications, you’re much more likely to care about the “why”, instead of the “what”. “Why do people love or hate the new product my company launched in market?” “Why are we having trouble resonating with a specific target market?” “Why is the product being returned more than projected?” These are the types of questions that are being asked and in order to provide an adequate answer you need to be able to perform segmentations on the data. Read more…

If you’re actively harnessing social listening platforms to deliver insights to your marketing and customer service organizations, congratulations! These two use cases, though most common, are in some ways also the most critical as they represent channels to both acquire and retain customers. But what’s beyond this? Some of the most advanced users of social listening platforms are hard at work developing processes to feed insights to multiple organizations within their companies, often referred to as “scaling across the enterprise.”

The Visible Intelligence platform is built to scale with the enterprise in mind. Here are four ways to scale social data across the enterprise:

1. Form a Steering Committee

Often times ideas get shot down because they don’t have enough executive buy-in. Form a cross-functional steering committee that is comprised of one or two people from each organization within your company that you feel may benefit from social media data. Then secure what’s called an executive sponsor, or senior-level person who has the ability to get behind an initiative and work it through corporate hierarchies to receive additional support and visibility. Read more…

Try the only enterprise-ready social media monitoring, analytics and engagement platform.